Enjoying the Ride

Enjoying the Ride's picture
Before my diagnosis I had a Chemical Engineering degree, an MBA, and a promising career. I had an amazing wife and two wonderful children (still do). I had a nice house with a swimming pool, a big lawn, and a bunch of toys. I was living the dream. I enjoyed a variety of physical activities such as golf, camping, hunting…driving, typing, and dressing myself. Then one day as I was jogging on my treadmill I noticed that my left foot went slap, slap, on the treadmill, whereas my right foot smoothly transitioned from heel to toe, heel to toe. After a year of visits to an assortment of specialists, I was diagnosed with Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis, a particularly disabling variety of MS. Twelve years later I sit here in my power wheelchair, dictating to my computer because my hands won’t allow me to type more than a couple of words. I can’t work anymore, and my wife now doubles as my caregiver. I’ve started this blog to help me pass the time while engaged in a productive activity- advocating for the disabled community, of which I am now a reluctant member. I am Mitch, and despite everything I am still Enjoying the Ride.

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Wed, 12/13/2017 - 4:25pm
“This is the way the world ends
Not with a bang but a whimper.”
T.S. Eliot
 

We hoped. We prayed (some of us did, anyway). We researched. We organized. The MS patient population and a few sympathetic practitioners stood up to the medical establishment, goddammit! I wrote forty blog posts about CCSVI (forty-one now). But, given what we know today, there’s something that must be said.

I was wrong.

We were wrong.

For those unfamiliar with this saga, the term CCSVI was coined by Dr. Paolo Zamboni of the University Ferrara, Italy, in 2008. The acronym stands for “chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency.” Zamboni theorized that restrictions in the veins that drain the central nervous system — the brain and spinal cord — contributed significantly to MS disease activity. Furthermore, he believed opening such restrictions via balloon angioplasty or the placing of cardiac stents could improve MS outcomes.

Tue, 12/5/2017 - 6:59am

To hear this podcast: click here

This is Mitch Sturgeon who is a user of MyCounterpane.com, as well as the founder of enjoyingtheride.com. Are you living with MS, progressing and feeling scared about it? This podcast is for you.

 
 
 
Hellooooo Lean Into Lonely, our first podcast, where MCP founder Kate Milliken dives into deeply personal moments of lonely from the people she knows. Why? Because more and more, we at MyCounterpane understand that we are ALLL…
API.MYCOUNTERPANE.COM
 
 
Tue, 11/21/2017 - 6:53pm
A Silhouette of Sadness
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

We’ve all heard this platitude before, but I have some questions about it.

After all, isn’t it a perversion of human decency to use another person’s suffering to improve our own outlook? Shouldn’t the acknowledgment that others are suffering make us feel worse, not better? Does it demonstrate a lack of compassion that we psychologically benefit from recognizing the distress of others?

No, no, and no.

Tue, 11/14/2017 - 7:44pm

Made Another “Best Blogs” List

A company called MyTherapy, which makes a smart phone app that helps patients track their medications, recently compiled their list of 15 Excellent MS Blogs, and Enjoying the Ride made the cut. Check it out — and congratulations to the others who were mentioned.

A Programmer in the UK Comes to My Rescue 

I’ve developed a problem with mousing. Until recently, I could operate the right-click and left click buttons on my computer mouse. Lately, however, when my brain sends the command for either my index finger or my middle finger to click the appropriate mouse button, both fingers respond and both buttons are depressed. This tends to screw things up.

Tue, 11/7/2017 - 3:21pm

So, you think making your bed is a pain in the ass? Try making my bed (I suggest using the full-screen button on the bottom right of the video):


The blue inflatables can be found here
The brown inflatable can be found here.

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